farmer

Amaranth’s Nutritional Value is Restoring Health

Phiona’s involvement in the Kabale food security program was a turning point in her life when she learned to grow, cook and eat amaranth. As a farmer living with HIV who was frequently sick from infections due to poor nutrition, her ability to work was severely affected.

Phiona says, “Two years ago, I lost 75 pounds, my white blood cell count was very low, and I didn’t have much energy for farming, even though I depend on farming as my sole livelihood and to care for my child.”

She managed to attend training on growing and cooking amaranth and received seeds to plant.  As soon as her amaranth leaves turned green, she started eating them as a cooked vegetable similar to spinach, and began to feel stronger. Her health continued to improve when she added the grain to her diet.

Phiona’s face lit up when she said, “When I began to eat amaranth, my energy was restored, and my life turned completely around! My weight’s back up to normal, and my blood cell count has more than doubled. I like amaranth best when it’s popped first; then I stone grind it into flour.  I mix some of the flour into whatever food I eat, or add it to maize or millet flours for porridge and bread. It is delicious!”

Amaranth has been shown to improve nutrient intake and white blood cell counts, so local partner PAG South Western Uganda continues to promote its use, especially among farmers affected by HIV and AIDS.

Caption: A healthy Phiona with amaranth plants

Uganda Kabale Program
Led by World Renew and Local Partner PAG South Western Uganda

Note: Phiona gave her permission to reveal her HIV status in this story

10/12/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Fertile Soil, Higher Profits with Conservation Agriculture

Even though she’s started improving her yields with conservation agriculture (CA), Specioza’s piece of land is too small to sustain her family, so she rents an additional plot. She says, “Even so, I still ended up with losses because the soil was exhausted, and our once-predictable climate has changed, making it hard to know what to plant when.”

Local partner PAG encouraged her to try a number of CA techniques aimed at replenishing the soil, like mulching and fertilizing with manure “tea” (liquid manure). During her training, she planted some climbing beans using traditional practices, and used CA on another plot, just to see the results from each.  She was astonished at the huge difference in quality and yield, and declares, “I will not stop practicing conservation agriculture now. After applying all this new knowledge both on my land and the rented land, the soil has started to regain its fertility and now I am making some profits.”

When one of her neighbors realized that the rented field had regained fertility and that Specioza was earning more profits, he thought he would take advantage of her hard work. He went to the land owner and tried to rent the plot at a higher price. Specioza was quite worried, but then gratified by the land owner’s generous reply:  “My land used to be worn out and exhausted, but now it has regained fertility because of Specioza. She is deserves to remain on it, since she takes such good care of it.”

Caption: Specioza’s climbing bean crop in a plot under conservation agriculture

Uganda Kabale Program
Led by World Renew with Local Partner PAG

05/29/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Village Savings and Loan Group Turns James’s Life Around

James, a farmer and the director of the school in his village, says that the ag training and support he has received from the program changed his family’s story from one of desperation to hope. Trained in information technology, he found it very difficult to earn enough money in the city to support his wife and three girls. He took a big risk by moving back to his village to take up farming. His first exposure to what the program had to offer was joining fellow farmers in starting a Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA). “This,” he says, “was the beginning of the turnaround for my family.”

James and his group received training in conservation agriculture techniques, growing vegetables, and Farming as a Family Business. This year, he and his family planted one acre of groundnuts (peanuts) to sell, and two acres of cassava to eat. What they earned from the groundnuts allowed them to buy a cow, and the milk adds protein to their diet. With their VSLA savings they bought five bags of cement and built another room onto their home. “I plan to borrow money from the VSLA to complete the work,” says James.

James’s story is representative of the general success of the program in his village. His VSLA is doing so well that it made a contribution to the school he was instrumental in starting. James was able to buy a blackboard, chalk and textbooks and even pay the teachers with the funds.

Caption: Village schoolchildren benefited from a donation by James’s savings group

Uganda Teso Program
Led by World Renew and local partner PAG-KIDO
96 communities, 11,624 households, and 51,944 individuals

05/16/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Mushrooming Success for Cambodian Farmers

Channy and Chantol, a young Cambodian couple, have seen many changes over the last few years, all thanks to a fungus.  They were among the first to adopt mushroom growing when World Hope began working in their village three years ago.  “We were skeptical at first, said Channy, “so we just built a small mushroom house to test it out.”  After realizing how beneficial mushrooms could be, they built a second, larger structure and their parents built two structures as well.
 
The couple works hard, and has become skillful mushroom growers.  Although they typically average an income of $300 per month, they have earned as much as $1,000 in a month from mushrooms alone.  This is especially impressive considering that the GDP per capita in Cambodia is $1,159.   On the off days between planting and harvest, Channy sells sugarcane juice for additional income.

As a result of their efforts, the couple has been able to purchase a motorbike, buy land, and build a new house. They are also raising chickens and ducks, and eating higher-quality food now, given their improved income. Their mushroom houses are still behind their parents’ home, but they plan to build additional structures on their own property soon. 

Although Channy and Chantol are in many ways model mushroom farmers, their success has not come without challenges.  Their parents recently filled in the land in front of their home, so when it rains hard, the water flows downhill into the mushroom house, bringing with it debris that can damage the growing crop.  In addition, now that others are also growing mushrooms, the necessary materials (rice straw and mung-bean pods) that were once readily available and free, are becoming very valuable and hard to find.


Cambodia East program
Led by World Hope
3 Communities, 340 Households, 1,700 Individuals



10/13/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Free to Serve

April 26, 2016 - On March 29, I was honored to be among the 250 people gathered at the Hall of Laureates in Des Moines, Iowa for “Women and Agriculture: The Road to Global Security”. Organized by the Foods Resource Bank, Oxfam America, and the World Food Prize Foundation, the event celebrated the critical leadership of women and the importance of ensuring human rights and eliminating hunger in order to achieve global peace and security.

Iowa’s Senator Joni Ernst shared a particularly powerful source of inspiration. While in college, she had the opportunity, through a government exchange program, to work alongside peasant farmers on a collective farm in then communist Ukraine. After a full day of manual labor, there were no tractors available on the collective farm, the Ukrainians and Americans would eat supper together. These conversations often included questions about agriculture in the United States, but the Ukrainians were even more interested in what it was like to be free.

What is it like to be free?

05/10/2016 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Working with hunger program brings farmer peace

DES MOINES — Conrad farmer Arlyn Schipper said participating in the Foods Resource Bank has given him peace in his soul.

Schipper, who is FRB executive committee vice chairman, shared what his organization is doing on a local and international level at last month's Iowa Hunger Summit in Des Moines.

"I'm here to talk about a organization I'm so proud of,

12/02/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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